Meet the Interns: Spring 2020

We’ve welcomed a fantastic team of interns to the Press this spring, and it’s our pleasure to introduce you to each of them. Check back here every #MeettheInternMonday as we post a new 60-Second Q&A for the next five weeks. 

P.S. Interested in interning with us this summer? Applications are due March 15! Learn more.

Meet Penelope

CCP: What’s your favorite aspect of the intern experience at Copper Canyon Press so far?

P: One thing I love about this internship is the fact that nobody here takes their job lightly. Sure, we all have fun, but everyone I have met has a deep sense of responsibility for the work that they do, and approach their work with intention. It is an honor to be able to read something that someone has spent countless hours crafting, regardless of whether or not it ends up as a Copper Canyon title. I am so grateful to be a small part of that.

CCP: Please tell us about a forthcoming Copper Canyon title you’re excited about, and why. 

P: One title that continues to stun me is Obit by Victoria Chang. This work explores the daily manifestations of grief after the loss of a loved one (in this case the speaker’s mother). Chang masterfully pens obits to what dies along with the mother—memory, appetite, the mother’s favorite potted tree. This work showcases the enormity and breadth of grief, how it infuses the quotidian. How it changes. And changes. And changes.

CCP: Please give us a line from a poem that you can’t get out of your head.

P: This line is from a poem called “Self-Portrait with My Dead Looming behind Me” by Diane Seuss. “They,” here, refers to “her dead:” “They fan behind me like the tail of a strange bird, // or like a deck of cards in the hands of a fly-by-night / magician: Pick a card, he says. Any card.” These lines are special to me. They speak to the transformative power of creation as well as the limits of that power. 

Meet Morgaine

CCP: What’s your favorite aspect of the intern experience at Copper Canyon Press so far?

M: As the production intern, I’ve worked directly with forthcoming manuscripts in a variety of ways. Not only do I enjoy working with the littlest details, as I’m called to do, but I’ve also been handed real responsibility. I appreciate this immensely. Each manuscript is a piece of a poet’s passion, time, hopes—to have even a slight part in honoring that piece by producing a polished book is not something I take lightly.

CCP: Please tell us about a forthcoming Copper Canyon title you’re excited about, and why. 

M: I’m so glad the world is receiving the gift that is Indigo by Ellen Bass. In this collection, no daily moment or task is too small to become both musical and meaningful in Ellen’s hands. The barrier between our inner and outer lives is broken down and spread from page to page. But most importantly, as a young queer woman engaged to my dream girl, I can’t quite say what it means to see my own identity reflected in poems of love and marriage. 

CCP: Please give us a line from a poem you can’t get out of your head.

M: After reading Vantage by Taneum Bambrick, I couldn’t get this out of my head, from the poem “This is a Target:” “This is the most giant American flag…. Hot water on the hot sand. A little red knife you got from your dad.”